Massivedynamic.co
Justice Reform

Slowly, more people are supporting the idea that reforms in the community supervision system are feasible and working, according to an article published by The Crime Report. Jessica Jackson, Chief Advocacy Officer at REFORM Alliance, elaborated more on the situation of how COVID-19 has affected and influenced these changing views. The pandemic has led offenders to be able to remotely check-in with probation officers, which allows for more focus and time being spent on rehabilitation. Government resources in the past have been spent on maintaining a parole and probation system that sends more individuals back to jail for technical violations rather than criminal behavior. It is structured to punish the individual instead of rehabilitating and taking a more reformed approach to reducing recidivism. Many individuals have expressed they do not feel supported by their officers and find it already hard readjusting to life outside bars without having to worry about all the technicalities. Arthur Rizer, a former police officer and law professor at George Mason University says community supervision should support individuals released from detention rather than just supervise them.

In order to reduce mass incarceration, something has to change in the support and rehabilitation resources offered to individuals in the community supervision division. TRACKtech, LLC is working to bridge this gap between individuals not feeling supported and provided enough resources to stay out of jail. With the TRACKphone, officers are able to remotely check-in with individuals via bio-metric identification and video conferencing. This allows for them to monitor an individual’s location and make sure they are compliant. Individuals also have access to a wide variety of rehabilitative resources and calendar reminders for job interviews and appointments. This helps them better integrate back into society and provide them with some stability to reduce recidivism rates.

0

Justice Reform
The negative impact that individuals experience after imprisonment is well documented, but the challenges facing families when a loved one is incarcerated are much less well known. A new study designated “Every Second”, produced in collaboration with a Cornell University research team and FWD.us, surveyed the prevalence of family imprisonment by a nationwide representative sample of 4,041 adults ages 18 and older. The results are staggering.

Approximately 113 million people have a family member who has spent time in prison or jail. Today, there is an estimated 6.5 million people who have an immediate family member presently incarcerated in prison or jail. Research has demonstrated that even for a short period of imprisonment, additional penalties such as fines and fees, constraints on employment and housing, and the loss of fundamental human rights can be devastating for people long after they have served their sentences. This penalizes not only the one incarcerated, but every family member that relies on them for financial support and security.

It is often difficult and expensive to maintain contact with a family member in prison or jail. The results from the survey demonstrate that only 1 person in 4 could visit their immediate family member during their time in prison or jail. Research has shown that sustaining contact with supportive family members during imprisonment increases the probability of successful reintegration into their communities after release, and less likelihood to be imprisoned again.

The results of this revolutionary new research are a strong reminder of the work required to mitigate the problems caused by mass incarceration and the effects it has on American families. Fortunately, a bipartisan consensus is emerging that our current processes do not make us more secure and that the financial and human costs of mass incarceration far overshadow any public safety benefits. States across the country are implementing evidence-based reforms to reduce imprisonment and improve the possibility of successful reintegration. Many organizations, such as TRACKtech are helping people prosper in their communities after they’ve been released from incarceration and facilitating family reunification.
0