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Public Safety

Many individuals struggle with their mental health and creating a stable lifestyle. Homelessness is one of the severe issues that needs fixing in the world. Mercy Housing published an article with 7 startling facts about homelessness in the United States.

First off, the homeless population in the United States could fill five football stadiums, as it was determined that 567,715 people were homeless on any given night in January of 2019, but this number still does not fully capture the state of homelessness in our country.

One in every 30 children, 2.5 million children per year, experience homelessness, which is roughly the entire population of Chicago.

Because children experience homelessness at such an early age, many have brain development setbacks that hinder their learning, handling of emotions, relationships, etc. and at least 40% of homeless school-age children have a mental health problem.

There are nearly 37,085 homeless veterans in the United States and more than half of them have a mental and/or physical disability. After fighting for our country, veterans are more likely than non-veterans to experience homelessness, mental health problems and substance abuse, as many struggle with traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder.

On a single night in 2019, homeless services providers had more than 48,000 beds set aside for survivors of domestic violence. Survivors of domestic violence and abuse gather the courage to leave their situations even when they have nothing, increasing their risk of homelessness and lack of resources.

Being homeless decreases an individual’s life span by 20-30 years, as the average life expectancy of a homeless individual is 50 years old.

Finally, homelessness is a risk factor for anyone, as many live paycheck to paycheck and unexpected events turn people’s lives around for the worse.

Homelessness is a problem that will not go away on its own. People continue to provide support and resources for those in the community to fight this widespread problem but cannot do it alone. If you have the resources or time to volunteer or donate items, that little bit can go a long way for someone in need.

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Public Safety

An article published by the Prison Policy Initiative suggests that the long-time stigma of releasing those awaiting trial does not harm public safety. There were no corresponding waves in increased crime in states, cities and counties. “We found four states, as well as nine cities and counties, where there is existing data on public safety from before and after the adoption of pretrial reforms.” All but one of these saw decreases or negligible increases in crime after implementing the pretrial reforms. This is a game changer, as COVID-19 has made jails even more dangerous and vulnerable for incarcerated individuals to become sick. By having pretrial release programs, individuals are staying safer and helping mitigate outside contact to those already behind bars.

In the past criminal justice reformers have long supported pretrial measures and programs but were opposed by district attorneys, police departments, the commercial bail industry and the public saying that releasing individuals puts community safety at risk. However, new studies are finding this to be untrue and that releasing non-violent individuals into community supervision decreases the risk of spreading COVID-19 and prison overcrowding. “About 75% of people held by jails are legally innocent and awaiting trial, often because they are too poor to make bail.” Jail populations can decrease significantly if more individuals are released into pretrial programs and supervision.

TRACKtech is working to keep communities safe, as well as reduce recidivism and stigma’s surrounding community supervision. Our solutions provide whole-person rehabilitation support and compliance monitoring services to those under any type of community supervision, such as pretrial, probation and parole. TRACKphone Lite allows courts to maintain communication and any necessary monitoring with pretrial individuals  as well as send them calendar reminders for upcoming court appearances. Rehabilitative support and additional resources are available through the app for individuals. Utilizing TRACKtech solutions provides a way to check in and communicate with pretrial individuals in a COVID-19 safe protocol prior to their court dates while also keeping the community safe.

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Public Safety

An article published by the Baltimore Sun earlier this year highlights how locking young people up will not result in less crime. New legislation and initiatives are being created in the hopes of addressing crime and violence in Baltimore. The crime rates among youth are due to many of them living in poverty conditions and having experienced trauma. These factors are hard ones to deal with when it comes to addressing crime rates and violence. A program was created named the Mayor’s Office of Children and Family Success that successfully looks at coordinating with city and community partners to address youth crime. The office launched BmoreLive to provide meaningful and entertaining programming for youth to enhance public safety and keep them occupied off the streets.

This programming helped keep crime rates down in juveniles and has shown to be effective. With identifying gaps in services and partnering with community actors, the BmoreLive is working to reduce youth crime and promoting better youth development. A punitive system is not helpful when fighting against crime in youth. Incarcerating youth does not teach them right from wrong when it comes to crime and does reduce their mentality surrounding the issue. When a child is incarcerated at a young age, it is very likely that they will commit another crime and end up in prison as an adult. Further, locking children up can lead to suffrage from trauma sustained in prison or mental health issues.

Because of these issues surrounding young incarceration, policy-makers are investing in more community-based services and programs that work on reducing incarceration and recidivism in youth populations. Putting juveniles behind bars does not solve public safety issues and does not result in less crime. Prevention efforts and justice reform for youth is necessary when it comes to keeping them occupied and committing less crime.  

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Public Safety

Community supervision has become the new norm for officers to monitor individuals out on bail, during pretrial, or serving probation and parole time. However, it is difficult to monitor those who have committed low level offenses or are registered sex offenders, as they are not closely monitored through tracking devices. In an article posted by the Crime Report, it is estimated that 25,000 convicted sex offenders and predators across the U.S. are unaccounted for. This is due to them registering their addresses as homeless shelters or from them moving and never being located concluding that their whereabouts are unknown to law enforcement.

There is a concerning issue at hand for how to monitor these individuals on the limited budgets and time of officers. This shortcoming predates the pandemic and has only increased the problem as space in jails and prisons is limited, so many have been released. Although steps have been taken to try to protect victims and those harmed by these individuals, it is not always conclusive. State registries often have many errors, including wrong addresses, names of individuals that have passed away, and some that have not verified their whereabouts in years. A new way of addressing the issue and protecting the community is vital.

TRACKtech is committed to problem solving, especially when it comes to monitoring individuals and keeping the public safe. TRACKphone allows officers to monitor the location of their program member without having to visually see them, as they can promptly request check-ins that require biometric identification. Officers can also set up geofencing and parameters that alert them when offenders are violating designated locations. Behavioral and mental health resources and programs are available on the phone for program members to access to help rehabilitate them, instead of punishing them. With the pandemic in full swing and more individuals being released, TRACKtech can provide solutions to urgent matters.

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Public Safety

It is no secret that the prison system is harsh and rigorous for both staff and inmates. Many inmates struggle with having access to care and resources when imprisoned. The Crime Report published an article about these difficulties and how dozens of prisons, including ones in Louisiana, Connecticut, Illinois, and Pennsylvania, are facing legal charges and being targeted in COVID-19 civil rights lawsuits.

Inmates tell their stories of how they were denied access to medical services and resources when sick or at-risk of contracting COVID-19. Prison staff, as well as inmates, struggle with COVID-19 procedures. There are shortages and difficulties when it comes to having enough staff to run facilities due to COVID-19 protocols. Inmates and staff feel wronged and are fighting back against the violations they have suffered while incarcerated and working for the prison systems. The lawsuits highlight that correctional authorities’ response to COVID-19 has been defined by inaction and resulted in consequences in the health and well-being of staff and inmates. Many individuals are seeking the release of inmates who are at high risk of contracting COVID-19 to help reduce the death toll that has been spreading through facilities.

As of July 21st, approximately 70,700 individuals behind bars have tested positive for COVID-19 and more than 700 have passed away, with these numbers continuing to rise. The well-being and safety of officers and inmates should be a priority. In order to help mitigate the spread and keep people safe, de-incarceration and community supervision has been the go to. Innovative solutions need to be considered in order to stop the spread and keep lawsuits at bay.

TRACKtech supports the health and well-being of officers and their clients in these hard times. With our solutions, probation and parole officers can remotely check-in with individuals through biometric identification and video conferencing. This allows both to stay at home and keep social distancing protocols while still being able to monitor the individual through geofencing built in to our TRACKphone. TRACkphone also provides resources and programs for rehabilitation and to help individuals feel at ease after being incarcerated. It is an adjustment into the society, especially during COVID-19. Community supervision is becoming the new norm as it reduces populations at risk of contracting COVID-19 in facilities and the costs of incarceration. Mobile supervision is one solution to the problems that keep arising in the criminal justice industry and the safety measures needed to take to mitigate COVID-19.

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Public Safety
An article posted by Corridor News addresses issues surrounding homelessness and recidivism rates in the Austin community. “The Downtown Austin Community Court (DACC) has facilitated dramatic reductions in repeat offenses among individuals experiencing homelessness and other vulnerable populations”. The Court is aiming to help reduce these issues by showing compassion and care to individuals, by using a rehabilitative approach instead of incarceration or admitting them to hospitals. This leads to the improvement of the individuals lives and reduces strain on public systems, including jails and health care programs.

The DACC has already seen dramatic reductions according to a recent study. “The analysis of citations issued to a group of 59 individuals experiencing homelessness both before and after their engagement with DACC’s Intensive Case Management program reveals that the number of citations plummeted by 99% from 1,556 before participating in DACC services to just 7 afterward”. The mission of the DACC is to continue to serve individuals experiencing homelessness with person to person contact and a comprehensive approach. They want to create safe and respectful environments for people and to provide them with the help they need.

The DACC program is also working with the Intensive Case Management (ICM) to stop the issuing of fines that lead to arrests or threats of jail time. Instead ICM provides access to support systems and programs for substance abuse, mental health care, peer support, basic needs, and permanent and transitional housing. The case management team is currently working with 122 people to combat homelessness and provide a second chance for them. As the program grows, they are expecting to help more people get back on their feet by providing necessary and basic services to combat homelessness and recidivism.
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Public Safety

The Marcus Harris Foundation posted about children of incarcerated parents needing support now more than ever. COVID-19 continues to turn the lives of families, especially those incarcerated, upside down. Children with parents who are incarcerated already suffer from lack of resources and recognition but even more so now. The children are not the ones at fault for being incarcerated but continue to feel the full effect and problems that come with incarceration of a parent. These children miss out on celebrating major milestones with their parents and now with COVID-19 affecting visiting hours and interactions with family members in prison, children are suffering even more. They are unable to visit or talk to their parents and continually worry about whether they are okay and safe.

Children may not understand the direct issues and problems that come with COVID-19, but they certainly can sense the stress it is putting on their loved ones. Facilities are being shut down, there is a concern for lack of equipment and testing in jails and prisons, early releases of individuals and movements of criminal justice reform that are causing riots and distress. An organization, Our Children’s Place (OCP), is encouraging communities to consider what they can do to support children whose parents are incarcerated. Professionals are able to check in with children and see how they are doing, while providing materials and resources such as books and tool kits online for youth. The resources are made for the children but also provide information for their caregivers and family members about access to food, books and other types of distribution efforts for children with incarcerated parents.

Children are the next generation of the world and need to be supported and cared for by all to show them the endless possibilities that still exist, even if they have parents who struggle. Learn more about how you can help in a time of need by visiting Our Children’s Place website linked above.

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Community Supervision, Public Safety

Like you, TRACKtech is closely monitoring the constantly evolving situation, both internally and externally, as it relates to the coronavirus (COVID-19). Though there is significant uncertainty, we remain committed to supporting the industry we serve by providing solutions that focus on the health and safety of the corrections agencies, staff, clients and public. We understand that our ability to assist you in facing these challenges, is critical and we stand ready to step in with that assistance wherever we are needed.

 

With the recent quarantines and lockdowns, exploring innovative community supervision is more important than ever. Officers need tools to effectively supervise their clients and to provide them with access to rehabilitative resources and support in a socially responsible manner.

 

Thankfully, leveraging technology, officers can adapt to the speed of rapidly changing circumstances, and safely connect with clients to keep them on track with remote meetings, check-ins, and other online services. And with partners such as Cisco, rapid deployment is available to implement remote communication.



Take a look at how technology is moving forward to continue making a difference in individuals’ lives during a crisis like this.
CLICK HERE FOR OUR SOLUTION

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Public Safety

In Charlotte, North Carolina an article was published by the Patch Staff in relation to a business robbery. The business reported two men entering the store mid-afternoon to steal money. The store owner confronted the two, trying to grab one suspect but they quickly made their escape. No one was injured in the process. After the incident, investigators were able to quickly identify one of the suspects, as he was wearing a court-ordered electronic monitoring device at the time of the robbery. The suspect had been arrested the previous month for being in possession of a stolen firearm and stolen vehicle, and then proceeding to discharge the firearm. Due to the electronic monitor on his ankle, police tracked him down and were able to convict him of the crime after a full confession. Without the tracking and pinpoints of the suspect’s whereabouts, the police would most likely not have been able to track him down.

TRACKtech, LLC is a platform designed for supervisors to be able to monitor and observe the locations of their program members. It pinpoints their location near-real time and allows for supervisors to check in with their program members remotely through the TRACKphone. More importantly than monitoring offender locations, the platform provides rehabilitative and life resources to those convicted in the hopes of reducing recidivism. Without reliable electronic monitoring devices and easy to use platforms, cases like these could go unsolved, and they also provide extra security in public safety concerns surrounding convicted felons on parole or probation. With rehabilitative resources available, ideally cases like this would not even occur. 

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Public Safety

Times Union recently published an article regarding how the Albany Sheriff’s office is going to help the homeless population. As jail populations have decreased, the Albany County Sheriff’s department is working on creating a new solution to help end homelessness. The program is set to be called the Sheriff’s Homeless Improvement Project and will use an empty tier in one of the jail’s buildings as a transitional housing and one-stop resource for those struggling to find a job, suffering from addiction or mental health issues and living on the streets. The programs for these struggling populations are centered around programs already being implemented in the jail that are offered to inmates. Sheriff Craig Apple states “whatever we can do to release somebody who can be healthy and productive back in the community, [is] our goal here.” They also are focusing on reducing recidivism rates and have already seen a drop as people are not coming back to jail. 

The jail population has been decreasing. In July, there were only 431 inmates , compared to the 1,000 it is able to house. This Albany jail is not the only one seeing a decrease in inmate populations, as the state’s total population in county jails fell over 13% from July 2018 to July 2019. Due to these new programs and the sheriff’s office working on rehabilitating inmates instead of employing a punitive approach, the jail is changing its name, to encompass its new mission; the Albany County Corrections and Rehabilitative Services Center. The jail is partnering with other centers including St. Peter’s Hospital, the Homeless and Traveler’s Aid Society, CDTA and other groups to create the program and build services. 

The homeless program is still in the works and Apple said they are trying to figure out their source of funding for food and housing. The facility will have rules similar to those of shelters and the staff will be civilians from nonprofits and the sheriff’s department. This saves the cost and limited resources of staffing correctional officers in the facility and gearing the workers towards what the population being housed in the facility will need. Apple is hopeful that this new facility and programs will help the homeless population get back on their feet and become functioning members of society again. 

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