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Jail Overcrowding
Overcrowding is becoming a frightening dilemma for many jails. The Sarasota County Jail is no different. Building a new jail to house these excess inmates is incredibly expensive to taxpayers, costing upwards of $100 million. To ease this overcrowding, the County Sheriff’s Office is utilizing what they call a “pod” program. Sarasota United for Responsibility and Equity (SURE) introduced the Addiction Recovery Program in partnership with the Salvation Army and the Sheriff’s Office in Sarasota County. These pods are intended to reduce recidivism rates while increasing an inmate’s productivity while incarcerated. All inmates in a pod are housed together. Instead of the inmates having excessive free time, they spend that time in programs, meetings, and receiving help for their various needs. The pods are completely voluntary, and any interested inmates must sign up to be included in them. There are up to 48 inmates in each pod and violence of any kind is strictly prohibited.

There are a multitude of pods in the prison, each dedicated to a specific program for rehabilitation and life skills. The addiction recovery pod has been in use for ten years, and in 2019 two new pod programs are being implemented in the jail; the care pod and the re-entry pod. The care pod is focused on providing mental health assistance. In the re-entry pod inmates will take parenting classes, learn how to search for jobs, create resumes and learn the importance of financial stability. Many of the inmates in these pods don’t know about the importance of credit scores, financing vehicles or budgeting. Without these essential skills and a secure footing in how to survive outside of prison, there is a very high risk of them reoffending. The pod program has shown to be very efficient and has changed the lives of countless inmates.
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Jail Overcrowding

Jail overcrowding is one of the most increasingly devastating dilemmas plaguing our justice system. One Missouri county, with the assistance of a company called All Detainment Solutions, claims to have a fantastic and cost-effective fix – storing their surplus of inmates in semi-trailers in a parking lot surrounded by a wire fence. It has been one year since Greene County adopted this unconventional practice. There are currently 108 men living in the 52-foot semi-trailers, meaning that every person has space that is less than half the capacity of a ping-pong table. Greene County Sheriff, Jim Arnott, has assessed that most of the men in the trailers have been charged with a crime and are pending trial, some of them could even be innocent. Many legal experts have deemed the confined spaces in these trailers as inhumane. David Shapiro, former staff attorney for the ACLU’s National Prison Project, has deemed this temporary jail a “recipe for disaster.”


Until work is completed on their expanded jail, the situation is said to be temporary. However, the completion of the jail is still years away, with no specific date of completion. County officials have suggested that the temporary prison could be kept open even after the permanent facility has expanded. There is already a multimillion-dollar contract with Canyon County Idaho for All Detainment Solutions to build a similar jail, and most likely more to follow.


Though this temporary jail is a creative and cost-effective way to tackle the problem of overcrowding, it will not solve the problem. Overcrowding of our prisons is just an indication of a wider problem with our underfunded criminal justice system and lack of sufficient community services. Instead of investing in warehousing inmates, we should be investing in programs that allow low-risk offenders or those who can’t afford bail, to be released on community supervision, saving both space and money.

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Jail Overcrowding

In the beginning of February, the House of Delegates in West Virginia approved a bill to help alleviate the overcrowding of their regional jails. The bill (HB 2190) requires individuals charged with certain misdemeanors to be released on personal recognizance instead of bail. This leads to both humanitarian and practical advantages, according to House Judiciary Chairman, John Shott, R-Mercer. 


The House Judiciary Committee was informed last week by Deputy Corrections Commissioner, Mike Coleman, that counties paid regional jails $1.9 million in 2018 for defendants who could not post bail of $1,000 or less. In 2018, approximately 3,750 people were jailed on misdemeanor charges and spent 11 days in jail before they were capable of posting bond. With a total of 41,058 days billed to counties, this policy of bail for misdemeanor charges carried a hefty price of $48.25 a day.


Spending any amount of time in jail, even a few days, can drastically affect one’s ability to retain a job. It is not uncommon for those waiting in jail to lose their jobs due to missing days of work. Not being able to tend to children or support their family is also an unfortunate outcome of time spent in jail while waiting to pay bail.  Misdemeanors generally include petty theft, disturbing the peace, public drunkenness, and traffic violations. Booking misdemeanor offenders takes time away from law enforcement officers that could spend their time on more serious offenses.


Releasing those accused of nonviolent crimes on personal recognizance is unquestionably valuable in solving the encroaching problem of overcrowding regional prisons. Those charged with misdemeanors involving violence, the threat of violence, crimes where the victim is a minor, the use of a deadly weapon, violations of the Uniform Controlled Substances Act, or traffic offenses including negligent homicide or driving under the influence would still be required to pay cash bail. 


This legislation allowing the release of most individuals charged with non-violent crimes on personal recognizance bonds was advanced to the Senate, where it passed with a vote of 91-4. Reforms such as this bill, are necessary to mitigate the encroaching dilemma of jail overcrowding. In addition to allowing officers to be present for more serious offenses and giving offenders the accountability of appearing for their court date, the reform will grant counties the ability to allocate those costs to other budgets.
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